Kirsty & Vipnagorgialla

This month we have two typeface expansion/makeovers: Kirsty from 2000 and Vipnagorgialla from 1998.

Kirsty was inspired by old railway lettering. While there weren’t many octagonal geometric typefaces available in the nineteenth century, straight lines were common in hand-painted signage. When Kirsty was released in 2000, it was available in Regular, Bold, Oblique, Bold Oblique as a distressed “ink” style. In place of lowercase letters, Kirsty had small caps. This new version of Kirsty has 5 weights and obliques with a proper lowercase. Kirsty Ink has been discontinued—a distressed version of Kirsty is in the works. Just in case someone still needs small caps, they have been included. If you have an app that supports OpenType small caps, you can access them. They can also be hand selected using a glyphs/character map—check the Unicode Private Use Area. Not all languages have small caps support. Most Latin based languages are supported but not Vietnamese, Cyrillic or Greek. The new Kirsty is slightly larger than the old one, due to its compact capital accents—you may need to use a smaller point size if you’re trying to match the original. As for languages: most Latin based languages are supported as well as Vietnamese, Greek and Cyrillic. There’s a free commercial use desktop license for regular, bold and obliques. Find out more about the new Kirsty.

Vipnagorgialla started life as Hemi Head, which was inspired by the late 1960’s Dodge/Plymouth logotype. The idea was to chop it down to “modernize” in a late 1970’s sort of way. The result is a typeface with a clunky cutting-edge look that’s still rooted in the 1960’s. Vipnagorgialla originally came in one very heavy style: Regular. It’s been expanded to five weights—what was previously Regular is now called Bold. In order to produce multiple weights, all characters had to be redrawn in a way that didn’t lose the original flavor but had a different kind of construction. The only big changes are the width of the E and F and the construction of the X. Accents have been redesigned and feature low profile diacritical marks on top of the capitals. As for languages: most Latin based languages are supported as well as Vietnamese, Greek and Cyrillic. There’s a free commercial use desktop license for Regular, Bold, Italic and Bold-Italic. Find out more about the new Vipnagorgialla.